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  • Retrieve all previous treatments of '''taxon'''.
    2 KB (256 words) - 17:19, 1 March 2013
  • The Portal will be an on-line flora of the plants of Canada, with taxonomic treatments taken from the Flora of North America. It will expand on the existing [http * Users will be able to edit taxonomic treatments.
    716 bytes (111 words) - 22:30, 1 March 2013
  • The Portal will be an on-line flora of the plants of Canada, with taxonomic treatments taken from the Flora of North America. It will expand on the existing [http * Users will be able to edit taxonomic treatments.
    716 bytes (111 words) - 22:31, 1 March 2013
  • ...'associated resources'' (e.g. specimens, images), and ''annotations''. The treatments comprise ''metadata''; ''character descriptions''; ''opinion''; and ''refer
    704 bytes (94 words) - 16:24, 4 March 2013
  • Julian has parsed FNA treatments to extract [https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AlZCRo88lw50dG1hVm
    2 KB (280 words) - 14:00, 8 April 2013
  • treatments, similar to what e-Floras currently does, and it also hosts an XML database
    958 bytes (157 words) - 15:58, 15 April 2013
  • The single species of Prenanthella was usually assigned to Lygodesmia in treatments prior to A. S. Tomb’s (1972b) reassessment. Its base chromosome number of
    2 KB (250 words) - 00:09, 19 February 2014
  • ...C. Grierson (1975); they have been recognized as distinct species in other treatments.
    1 KB (166 words) - 00:14, 19 February 2014
  • ...s and Uropappus were ranked as sections of Microseris in earlier taxonomic treatments (K. L. Chambers 1955, 1960). Because of its hybrid origin, Stebbinsoseris i
    3 KB (351 words) - 00:08, 19 February 2014
  • ...llowed here. Species circumscription varies among authors, but most modern treatments recognize the species as defined here. The most useful field characteristic
    2 KB (277 words) - 00:18, 19 February 2014
  • This page is for discussion of software that generates taxonomic treatments with serializations aimed at machine processing, e.g. RDF or XML.
    141 bytes (22 words) - 19:04, 31 May 2014
  • ...morphologic terms are used in particular ways as applied here to them.For treatments of composites here, “perennials” are herbaceous and differ from annuals
    320 KB (43,261 words) - 02:58, 10 October 2014
  • ...ea nigrescens has been variously merged with C. jacea and C. nigra in past treatments or maintained as a distinct species, sometimes with multiple subspecies (e.
    7 KB (1,099 words) - 02:58, 10 October 2014
  • ...for North America, broader at least than what is usually seen in European treatments. For instance, the species most familiar to North Americans were introduced
    22 KB (2,956 words) - 02:58, 10 October 2014
  • ...s and Uropappus were ranked as sections of Microseris in earlier taxonomic treatments (K. L. Chambers 1955, 1960). Because of its hybrid origin, Stebbinsoseris i
    3 KB (443 words) - 02:58, 10 October 2014
  • ...y differ markedly in their ecologic specializations, as indicated in their treatments below. The DNA studies also showed a very close relationship between S. mal
    9 KB (1,169 words) - 02:58, 10 October 2014
  • ...n=The single species of Prenanthella was usually assigned to Lygodesmia in treatments prior to A. S. Tomb’s (1972b) reassessment. Its base chromosome number of
    2 KB (262 words) - 02:58, 10 October 2014
  • ...f Gamochaeta was emphasized by A. L. Cabrera (1961, and in later floristic treatments of South American species) and by other botanists who have treated it as a
    11 KB (1,324 words) - 02:59, 10 October 2014
  • ...C. Grierson (1975); they have been recognized as distinct species in other treatments. }}
    2 KB (200 words) - 02:59, 10 October 2014
  • ...Logfia (including Oglifa) has been separated for some decades in Old World treatments. Contrary to G. Wagenitz (1969), I agree with J. Holub (1976, 1998) that th
    6 KB (756 words) - 02:59, 10 October 2014

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